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2nd trimester Pregnancy Sex

How to deal with changes in sexual desire for pregnant women in the second trimester

– Living a pregnancy is certainly a very pleasant moment for husband and wife who just got married. The awaited pregnancy sometimes makes mothers more worried about carrying out various activities, including having sex.

This is the reason why sex drive can be changed

However, in fact, pregnancy is not a barrier for couples to continue having intercourse, as long as it is done in the right position so as not to endanger the mother and the fetus. Even so, some women who are pregnant say that there is a change in sexual desire.

Mothers, Know To Increase Sexual Desire in the Second Trimester

During the first trimester, it is natural for mothers to feel a decrease in sexual desire, because the body is adjusting to hormonal changes, such as nausea, vomiting, pain in the breasts, and many more. Of course, mothers are no longer excited to have intimate relationships with their partners.

Obstetrician at New York’s Montefiore Medical Center , Monica Foreman, said that sexual arousal in pregnant women in the second trimester will actually increase. In addition to the stomach that is not too big, there is a collection of blood in the vagina which makes the sex organs swell and releases a lot of lubricant. Of course, this is the right time for pregnant women to have sex.

At this time, the hormone estrogen will experience an increase in production which circulates more blood, including in vagina, so this organ will be more sensitive to stimulation. Likewise with breast changes that appear a little bigger.

But before deciding to have intercourse, it’s good for the mother to have her womb checked. This is necessary to determine the health condition of the fetus, as well as whether the time is right for the mother to return to having sex with her partner. If the mother’s sexual desire is good and the condition of the fetus is safe for the mother to have intercourse, the doctor will allow it. To ensure this condition, there is nothing wrong with visiting an obstetrician at the nearest hospital to ensure that the pregnancy is in a healthy condition.

After the doctor states the condition of the womb is healthy, it doesn’t hurt to do some of these tips so that mothers can deal with changes in sexual desire in the second trimester. Reporting from the Parents page site, mothers can try to wear comfortable clothes before having intercourse. Not only that, mothers and their partners can plan a vacation together with their partner before the birth of a child. That way, the emotional closeness of the mother and partner will increase and intensify.

Pay attention to this when the mother enters the second trimester

Know the Right Position for Sex in the Second Trimester

Even though some health experts say that the second trimester of pregnancy is the most pleasant time for couples to have intercourse, still mothers and their partners need to know what sex positions you can try. There are also sex positions that are recommended are:

1. A sitting position facing each other, with the father sitting on a chair and the mother sitting on the father’s lap.

2. All fours that allow deeper penetration. Even so, this position is no longer recommended in the third trimester.

3. Position facing each other while lying down. The size of the stomach that is not too big allows the mother to still be able to do this position.

Know the Risk of Miscarriage in the Second Trimester

In addition to determining a comfortable position for the mother, as reported by the UK National Health Services, several pregnancy conditions experienced by the mother make the mother have to avoid intercourse, such as the mother who has experienced a rupture of the membranes because it can increase the risk of infection in the unborn baby, disorders of the cervix, and there is a disturbance in the placenta.

Reference:
Web MD. Accessed in 2019. Sex During Pregnancy: Is It Safe?
Parents. Accessed in 2019. How To Keep Your Sex Drive Alive During Pregnancy
UK National Health Services. Accessed 2019. Sex In Pregnancy